decided


decided
decided, decisive are often confused, especially when they mean positive and leaving no room for doubt, uncertainty, or further discussion. In this sense the words are applied chiefly to persons, their natures, their utterances or manner of utterance, their opinions, or their choices.
Decided implies a contrast with what is undetermined, indefinite, and neither this nor that; thus, a decided blue raises no question of its greenness or blackness; a decided success so far overpasses the line between success and failure that no one can question its favorable termination; a decided answer leaves no doubt of a person's meaning, wishes, or intentions. When applied to a person's character, expression, or movements decided suggests such qualities or outward signs of qualities as determination, resolution, and lack of all hesitation or vacillation
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the mother was a decided person to whose will everyone in the family submitted

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he has very decided opinions

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I see too many ways of saying things; a more decided mind hits on the right way at once— Ward

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then with a decided step she turned toward home— Wharton

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Decisive, on the other hand, implies an opposition to what is unsettled, uncertain, or wavering between this and that (for this sense as applied to things see CONCLUSIVE). When used in reference to persons it implies ability or intent to settle or success in settling a controverted matter once and for all
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this was enough to determine Sir Thomas, and a decisive "Then so it shall be" closed that stage of the business— Austen

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she stood up and surveyed herself in the pier glass. The decisive expression of her great florid face satisfied her— Joyce

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Analogous words: *definite, definitive: determined, resolved (see DECIDE): positive, cocksure, certain, *sure: categorical, *explicit, express
Contrasted words: dubious, *doubtful, questionable, problematic

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Decided — De*cid ed, a. 1. Free from ambiguity; unequivocal; unmistakable; unquestionable; clear; evident; as, a decided advantage. A more decided taste for science. Prescott. [1913 Webster] 2. Free from doubt or wavering; determined; of fixed purpose;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • decided — decided, decisive 1. Both words have to do with decision and decision making, and their meanings overlap; but there are clear differences. When used of people, decided means ‘having clear opinions’ and decisive means ‘able to decide quickly’;… …   Modern English usage

  • decided — resolute, 1790, pp. adj. from DECIDE (Cf. decide). A decided victory is one whose reality is not in doubt; a decisive one goes far toward settling some issue. Related: DECIDEDLY (Cf. Decidedly) …   Etymology dictionary

  • decided — [adj1] certain, definite absolute, assured, categorical, cinched, clear, clear cut, clinched, destined, determined, distinct, emphatic, explicit, express, fated, for sure*, indisputable, in the bag*, nailed*, on ice*, positive, prearranged,… …   New thesaurus

  • decided — [dē sīd′id, disīd′id] adj. 1. definite and unmistakable; clear cut [a decided change] 2. unhesitating; determined decidedly adv …   English World dictionary

  • decided — index absolute (conclusive), actual, affirmative, axiomatic, categorical, certain (fixed), certain …   Law dictionary

  • decided — ► ADJECTIVE ▪ definite; clear. DERIVATIVES decidedly adverb …   English terms dictionary

  • decided — [[t]dɪsa͟ɪdɪd[/t]] ADJ GRADED: ADJ n Decided means clear and definite. They got involved in a long and exhausting struggle and were at a decided disadvantage in the afternoon... He s a man of very decided opinions. Syn: definite …   English dictionary

  • decided — adjective 1) they have a decided advantage Syn: distinct, clear, marked, pronounced, obvious, striking, noticeable, unmistakable, patent, manifest; definite, certain, positive, emphatic, undeniable, indisputable, unquestiona …   Thesaurus of popular words

  • Decided — Decide De*cide , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Decided}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Deciding}.] [L. dec[=i]dere; de + caedere to cut, cut off; prob. akin to E. shed, v.: cf. F. d[ e]cider. Cf. {Decision}.] 1. To cut off; to separate. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] Our seat… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English


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